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2017 Snowman with Center Sign Wreath Tutorial

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New Snowman Wreath tutorial that we did a Facebook Live on 10/12/17. Items for this project were included in a kit which has already sold out, but, we’ll leave the instructions up since other products can be chosen and basic instruction followed for a wreath with a similar look.

Supply Kit Contains: (Sold out)

X750427 24″ White Pencil Wreath – 1

AP0123 Snowman Metal Sign – 1 (Sold out – but we do have a 9″ bottle cap snowman sign in stock right now 2304870)

XB94610-01 10″ Snowball Iridescent Poly Mesh – 2 Rolls

RG867702 2.5″ Falling Snow Ribbon – 1 (Sold out, but we have other similar styles in our Christmas ribbon)

RG0101324 2.5″ Red Metallic Ribbon – 1 (Sold out)

RW721741 2.5″ White Red Polka Dot Ribbon – 1

RG01048L6 1.5″ Black White Check Ribbon – 1 (Sold Out)

Summary:

Pencil Wreath: We chose a 24″ white pencil wreath for this project, but you could use other colors – iridescent white, red, black or silver. Our 24″ pencil wreath measure 15″ across the widest ring, but with the addition of mesh and other products you wind up with a finished wreath that measures 24″ or greater. You could also use a regular work wreath for this project, just stay with a 24″

Mesh: We chose two rolls of snowball mesh. This has been a very popular product and we’ve been selling it for several years now. It has iridescent foil and little white puffs. The mesh was 10″ in width and 10 yards in length. One roll isn’t enough, but it doesn’t take all of two rolls so you’ll have a bit left over.

We used the “ruffle” technique for this wreath because it’s one of the easiest for beginners. The mesh was cut into 30″ lengths. One length was used for one ruffle. We watched Lori with Hard Working Mom a few weeks ago and she had made her ruffles 30″ in length to help reduce the raveling. All mesh ravels for sure! But this does help. The fewer cuts you can make in your mesh and the less you handle it will help. A long time ago we started out making ruffles about 15″ in length and decided to try three 10″ ruffles and that turned out nicely. Now we’re going back to making them longer again….what goes around comes around as they say))) It all depends on the type mesh we’re working with as to whether we do two 15″ ruffles or one 30″ ruffle. Some mesh products are really bulk when gathered up and on those, we’ve been doing two 15″ ruffles. This mesh works great with one 30″ ruffle for each twist.

In the video, we compared ruffles to see if there was any different in how three 10″, two 15″ or one 30″ ruffle looked. We didn’t think you could tell any difference. Having less strings to cut is always a plus. Be sure to clip your strings rather than pull too.

 

To make your ruffle, let the mesh just roll up naturally on the table. Spread the mesh out, working from the top side of the roll (cut edges will want to roll under) starting at the cut edge, scrunch up through the middle of the 10″ piece gathering it up tightly. It will look like a bow tie.

Open up a twist on the wreath and secure the ruffle with a couple of turns. We started on the outside of our wreath. You only need to secure with a couple of turns right now, because you’ll be opening that up later, to add a ribbon cluster.

Continue working around the outer ring and then move to the inner ring, same size ruffle and one in each twist.

It will help if you go ahead and put a chenille strip on the back as a hanger. This will help you keep up with your center point when finding the position for your sign.

Ribbon: Ribbon can be added in several different ways. You can make strips, loops, small bows. Just choose which method you like the best. Ribbon strips is also one of the easiest methods to do. We chose four ribbons for this project. Some were 2.5″ in width and some 1.5″. All the ribbons were on 10 yard rolls.

It’s always good to do a test ribbon before you starting cutting up your ribbon. We settled on 11″ strips for this project.https://www.trendytree.com/ribbon/25-metallic-red-royal-ribbon.html  Ribbon is just a matter of preference. You might rather have no ribbon and use a bow or a couple of bows. Again, strips are just an easy way, especially for beginners.

 

 

 

There are 18 twists, typically, on our 24″ wreaths. So we cut 18 pieces of each ribbon. We angled the ends of the ribbons. Sometimes on the 2.5″ ribbons we cut the ends with a dovetail or chevron cut and we’ll show you how to do that in the video, but for our project this time, we just angled all the ribbons. Ribbon tips will curl up and the stiffer or thicker ribbon you have will help.

We took one of the each four ribbons and just alternated when picking them up. No particular pattern, but did try to alternate them a bit. Pinch the ribbon in the center and pick up another strip. Sort of spread them out in your hand so they are not stacked right on top of each other.

Open up a twist on the wreath, making sure the ruffle stays in place, lay the ribbon cluster down and re-secure the tie now with three to four turns. Place a ribbon cluster in each twist around the wreath.

 

Again, this is a matter of preference. You might be applying a sign and might want to leave ribbon off that would be under the sign and not seen anyway, so just experiment.

Sign: The snowman sign is 12″ in diameter and come with a wire hanger. We folded the wire hanger to the back, but you could cut if off if you wanted to. We used the two holes from the hanger to insert long pieces of floral wire. We also needed a hole at the bottom, but right now didn’t have anything at the shop to make a hole with! I had tried previously with a nail and hammer, but that didn’t work. They make a sheet metal hole punch and we have to get one!

I haven’t gotten one of these yet, but I’ve been assured that it’s a great tool and this was from someone who works with sheet metal signs everyday. Here’s our Amazon affiliate link: EuroPunch 1.25mm

We took a very small Command hook and stuck it to the bottom of the sign  and used that to attach a piece of floral wire. Hang the wreath on the wall and decide on your placement. The snowman sign is round metal, so the best place for it was the center of course. You want to position the sign to where it’s not pulled in too deeply into the wreath. Secure the wires to the wreath frame.

 

 

It can sort of sit on the ruffles and just lift out ribbons here and there and you may have to push some ruffles out of the way and to the back of the wreath so you can see the wording on the sign well.

When you’re all done, be sure to clip all your strings and check the back of your wreath for anything sharp that might scratch your wall or door. The overall diameter of the wreath was about 27″ or so.

 

 

 

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